The market-based approach to resilience in Ethiopia: qualitative evidence from South Omo

  • By Gil Yaron, Adanech Dutu and Dave Wilson
  • 21/09/2018

Women’s focus group discussion in Hammar woreda. Image credit: Gil Yaron

Share

Participatory discussion with two pastoralist communities in South Omo and key informant interviews with project staff and government officials provided an insight into the effectiveness of the Market-Based Approaches to Resilience (MAR) project in Ethiopia implemented under the Department for International Development (DFID) BRACED programme.

Though all stakeholders thought that BRACED project interventions had partially mitigated the impact of the 2015/16 drought and helped with recovery, communities and project staff scored the effectiveness of interventions differently. Community members particularly valued Participatory Natural Resource Management (PNRM) when the drought struck while project staff also accounted for the huge amount of work required to secure these benefits and saw village savings and loan schemes (VSLAs) as the most efficient way to build resilience. Community participants ranked their VSLAs second to PNRM in terms of drought resilience but identified clear livelihood benefits. Weather information was also valued by users, but it was less useful for more remote communities. Our findings also suggest a number of changes that are likely to make the thresholds used to calculate the resilience index adopted by the project more useful.

Video

From camel to cup

'From Camel to Cup' explores the importance of camels and camel milk in drought ridden regions, and the under-reported medicinal and vital health benefits of camel milk

Blogs

As climate risks rise, insurance needed to protect development

Less than 5 percent of disaster losses are covered by insurance in poorer countries, versus 50 percent in rich nations


Disasters happen to real people – and it's complicated

Age, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation and many more factors must be considered if people are to become resilient to climate extremes


NGOs are shaking up climate services in Africa. Should we be worried?

A concern is around the long-term viability of hard-fought development gains


The paradox of water development in Kenya's drylands

In Kenya's Wajir county, the emphasis on water development is happening at the expense of good water governance


Latest Photos

Tweets