Routes to resilience: insights from BRACED year 1

  • By Paula Silva Villanueva, Catherine Gould and Florence Pichon
  • 14/12/2016

Credit: Dieter Telemans

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BRACED projects cover a wide range of issues, from securing, servicing and promoting trans-border livestock mobility across the Sahel, to sharing skills and technology to improve the uptake of climate information in Ethiopia, to supporting smallholder farmers in Nepal to take advantage of economic opportunities and investments in climate-smart technologies. Furthermore, each BRACED project uses different intervention strategies and are being implemented in different climatic and operating contexts. This report identifies emerging themes, challenges and draws broader lessons about changes in resilience, how these can be understood and the factors shaping them.

A companion paper 'Routes to resilience: lessons from monitoring BRACED’, examines a related question: ‘What lessons have we learnt from the monitoring and results reporting efforts to date in BRACED?’ This reflection paper reflects on the M&E framework itself and the experiences of the Knowledge Manager in rolling out the framework and testing it for the first time through the year 1 project- to programme-reporting process followed in order to produce this synthesis report.

This paper forms part of a series of evaluations that looks across three years of BRACED, to find out more, read:

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