5 cognitive biases in climate risk management

  • By Roop Singh
  • 29/06/2018

Illustrations by Rebeka Ryvola

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Our brains use shortcuts to help us make decisions. Sometimes called ‘cognitive biases,’ these shortcuts are essential for making quick decisions such as deciding to swerve to avoid a car accident. However, these automatic judgements can also lead to bad decision-making when we rely too heavily on intuition and use defective reasoning. This infographic series explains 5 common shortcuts, how they play a role in decision-making related to climate risk management, and strategies to outsmart our tendency to use shortcuts.

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