Archive Webinar: Realities of El Nino driven drought in Ethiopia and dilemmas in the middle: Absorptive and anticipatory capacities in the test

  • By Roop Singh, Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre
  • 31/05/2016

Community representatives in Kombolcha (left) and one of drought stricken sorghum field intercropped with chat in hedges (right) - source: Mulugeta Worku, Christian Aid

31 May, 11:30 UK time (GMT+1) Join this IP led webinar on how household’s capacity to absorb the impacts the 2015 drought in BRACED districts of Ethiopia coupled with growing unpredictability of rainfall conditions have perplexed their adaptation decisions. It highlights one of the fast expanding adaptation options - a perennial shrub called "chat" - pursued by many households and its implications on local food supply. At the end, it will touch on current engagements for resilience building and propose further works that need to be done to unlock the challenges and reinforce on-going efforts. By: Mulugeta Worku, Christian Aid Ethiopia

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